Spotlight: Haim Ginott

We want to introduce you to Haim Ginott today. He is, sadly, no longer with us but over 50 years after his death in 1973, his wisdom can still startle us with its insight, humor, and clarity. He was a clinical psychologist who began his…

Teaching Practice: Grades and Comments

How do you improve writing without “Purposeful practice”, review, and renewal? This applies to all forms of writing, of course, not just literature essays. We all know the routine: student hands in essay / piece of writing; teacher carefully reads and annotates it over the…

Teaching Practice: Social Emotional Learning – The Teacher Side

There are five elements of social-emotional learning, according to The Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning. They are: Self-awareness Self-management Social awareness Relationship skills Responsible decision-making Many faculty tend to be shy when it comes to incorporating social-emotional learning into their curriculum. After all,…

Students: What is the Well-Rounded Student?

We all talk about the well-rounded student. But do we have any idea what it means? From a student’s point of view, it seems to mean that adults think they should be perfect at everything from the moment they hit kindergarten and are expected to…

Spotlight: Bruce Johnson – Inspiration to Really Support Each Student

Bruce Johnson is a physics professor at Arkansas State University. This picture went viral in 2018 when one of his students, Kristen Black, posted the picture on social media. The student had a daycare conflict and Bruce just told her to bring the child to…

Teaching Practice – What is an Authentic Task or Authentic Assessment?

The word authentic is thrown around a lot. What does it really mean? The main point of an authentic task might be to get the students to a point where they are finding ways to solve problems themselves within a real-world context. The difference between…

Teaching Practice – Why Shadowing a Student Should be Compulsory

Teachers and students live in two realities. There is overlap but there is no real knowledge and little understanding. Let me illustrate. When teachers give homework, do they have any idea as to the context of that homework for the student? Do they know: The…

Teachers as Leaders: Five Lessons in Teacher Leadership

As teachers, it is hard to set yourself up as an expert amongst your peers. We don’t want to feel “better than” others. We don’t want to appear to be arrogant. We might also occasionally have a colleague who has been around a long time…

Spotlight: Charlotte Mason

As we start another new year, we put our spotlight on a January baby, Charlotte Mason, born January 1st, 1842. She is another great and innovative educator who helped change the way we think about children and their upbringing. She published the 6 volume Original…

Teaching Practice: Mistakes and Success – Example from Dan Meyer and Mathematics

In a recent blog, Dan Meyer offered the following example of a table with answers filled in. The question sheet may have looked something like this: Marbles Water Level  0 609 1 626 2 643 3 ? 10 ? 15 ? The students’ answers, and…

Teaching Practice: Scaffolding for The Expert and the Beginner Student

What does scaffolding look like for students who are experts and those who are beginners? And here we are talking about students in the same class. Let’s look at some of the issues involved. If students are having a good time, it is easy to…

Teaching Students: Understanding Your Teenage Students

Much of this material is taken from Blakemore’s The Secret Life of the Teenage Brain. The article is inspired by Laurence Steinberg’s statement in Age of Opportunity (2015): “American adolescents are not doing well…Adolescent’s drug use is on the rise, as is attempted suicide, bullying,…

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