Turning Math Upside Down

Cathy Seeley is the former President of the National Council for Teaching Mathematics. She has spent the last several years talking about Turning Teaching Upside Down in mathematics and this article reviews what she is saying. Her phrase, Upside Down, depending where you are on…

Are Read Alouds Hurting Early Learners?

An article by Richard Allington provides interesting insights into the teaching of reading. Professor Allington is Professor of Education at the University of Tennessee, was an elementary school teacher, and has written many books and articles on reading. He makes the provocative statement: “In almost…

Making Feedback Vital for Learning

We know that student achievement is powerfully impacted by feedback that is skillfully given. We know that student achievement declines when feedback in the form of summative evaluation is carried out. “There are clear messages for how the negative impact of summative assessment on motivation for…

Finding Sunshine for Winter Wellness

What does the winter holiday mean to you? It means, of course, family, religious celebration, feasting, gift giving and receiving. One way of thinking about it is as the season of light. This year, the winter solstice is on December 21st, 2017 although it can…

Jeffrey Wright: The Greater Calling

“One Size Fits All Doesn’t Work” Meet Jeffrey Wright, physics teacher, father and family man, and a teacher who inspires his students many of whom freely admit they fall asleep in other classes. He is, of course, an excellent teacher. Watching the video however shows…

Adding Up Mastery Learning in Math

In 1984, Benjamin Bloom (of the famous Bloom’s taxonomy), published a paper titled “The search for methods of group instruction as effective as one to one” . In it, he and his research team split students into three groups – conventional learning where tests were done…

Struggling in the Real World

My daughter highlighted her way through AP Literature and AP US History, working assiduously evening after evening for months at a time. She got 4s in both examinations too suggesting that her study habits were excellent. Obviously, that wasn’t the only thing she did but…

Thinking about Teaching

As we teach each day, it may be easy for many of us to remember that there is an entire world outside our classroom windows. That world is not the world of concrete and manufactured environments but the world of nature. That doesn’t include the…

What Kids Will Remember

As teachers, it’s easy to get swept up into the fad of marks and grades and college acceptance and kindergarten graduation and learning how to read, write, count, tweet. That’s also extremely exhausting, something like businesses must feel about corporate results being published every quarter…

Thinking about Teaching

We know that psychology matters. It is easy to be both skeptical that psychologists can help us and at the same time willing to admit that psychological constructs can make sense. Carol Dweck’s mindset theory comes to mind. A review of some mindset literature in…

STEM for Lower School

A recent Edutopia article considers how we might teach higher-level engineering skills to elementary students. The first step is for us to actually believe that our students are capable of complex thought! The teacher in this account used Backwards Design Thinking to construct projects that…

Innovative Arts

If you are one of the many fine arts teachers trying to convince your colleagues of the importance of your curriculum vs. “core academics”, we would love to introduce you (and them) to Sir Ken Robinson and his explosive (and entertaining) contribution to the critical…

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